Bangkok, capital of Thailand is maybe one of the more open among the cities of Southeast Asia. Despite this, the history of this country has been characterized by political instability and an endless series of putsch. In 2011 it was attacked by another wave of violence. The clashes by the red shirts have caused 91 deaths and 2,000 wounded and unrest continued until May of 2014 with another military coup still in progress.

In Laos and Vietnam, since the end of the war in 1975, the Communist Party is still the only one in the government and continues to set the rhythms of life and traditions related to the culture of the land. Society is directed by the guide lines of the party and everywhere stand out slogans, flags and propaganda symbols.

In Cambodia, however, Russians and French investments push forward the country to a new tourism development that is changing the old Khmer culture, despite the shadows of the tragic past are still well visible in all the country.

At the beginning of 2015, therefore, the social and political landscape of Southeast Asia that once was called Indochine is very complex and faces a new generation in which grow up various sub-cultures apparently distant from the events surrounding them. Artists, writers, skaters, rappers, tattoo artists, martial arts fighters, performers, street artists who have western lifestyles and scramble them, adapting them to the Eastern tradition. Youth groups with a clear social and stylistic identity who rebel to an outdated system, eat noodles and dress Americana.

This is the the twenty-first century’s Indochine, where the ancient British, French and Chinese colonialism have given way to the world of American and European multinationals, Russians and Japanese investors. A corner of the world that gain a leading position together with the new developing economies.

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INDOCHINE 2.0

-The underground rebels-

Cambodia | Laos | Thailand | Vietnam

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